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El gabinete de arquitectura. Solano Benitez. Asuncion, Paraguay. photos by Leonardo Finotti (c) Solano Benitez

The Shack. Broadhurst Architects. South Fork Mountain. West Virginia. source. photos (c) Broadhurst Architects

from the architects:  The shack was created as a logical step between tent camping, and the yet unrealized weekend cottage. This fundamental shelter has no electricity. Oil lamps provide light. Heat is provided by a small wood stove, which is also used to heat water that is delivered to the “kitchen” sink by a gravity system.

The Crip. Broadhurst Architects. Strathmore Arts Center. Maryland. photos (c) Broadhurst Architects

from the architects:  The current interest in such small buildings, in simplicity, and environmental responsibility has led us to design this prototype building with sustainable and recyclable materials that can be fabricated off site then transported and quickly assembled where desired.

House in Yagi by Suppose Design Office | Posted by CJWHO.comHouse in Yagi by Suppose Design Office | Posted by CJWHO.comHouse in Yagi by Suppose Design Office | Posted by CJWHO.comHouse in Yagi by Suppose Design Office | Posted by CJWHO.comHouse in Yagi by Suppose Design Office | Posted by CJWHO.com

cjwho:

House in Yagi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | via

On a narrow site Suppose Design Office created the ‘House in Yagi’ which consists almost entirely of concrete. The idea was to have an incomplete/complete form. Unlike other projects, the final stage of construction for this house was not aiming towards a finish stage, but to let the owner experience the sense of completion after living here.

The interior space of the house is designed to maximize the interaction to its surrounding environment. Ground floor material remained the same as the original site, with a single tree standing in the centre to present a natural contrast with the surrounding area.
Windows of the 1st storey are kept open without any window shield or glass and creates an interesting interaction with wind and rain. Through this different interpretation of connecting the exterior and interior space, new ways of living can be explored by the client.

Photography: Toshiyuki Yano

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(via archoftheworld)